Karen Golden-Biddle

Strategist for Cultural Transformation

Karen Golden-Biddle

Karen Golden-Biddle works with today's leaders to ignite a new practice of people-driven discovery for cultural transformation that generates dramatically different and better outcomes.

Karen’s culture-focused methods are based on her teaching, field-based research and consulting with a wide range of companies such as Ericsson International, British Petroleum, and the American Cancer Society. She is Boston University’s Questrom Professor in Management. Karen is a sought-after voice on business discovery, transformation, and cultural change. She has been featured in academic journals such as the Academy of Management Journal as well as Harvard Business Review and Sloan Management Review. Karen’s work is used in doctoral programs at top business schools around the world including Harvard Business School, The Wharton School, Ross Michigan, and Cambridge Judge Business School. Karen was inducted into the Academy of Management as a Fellow in 2018.

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How “Micro-Moves” Can Drive Major Health-Care Change

How “Micro-Moves” Can Drive Major Health-Care Change
Oct 01, 2013 by Karen Golden-Biddle
The complexity of today’s healthcare organizations makes it hard to change the way they do things. Conventional wisdom holds that real transformation requires bringing in consultants, undertaking large-scale and highly visible action, and jolting the organization into change. But there’s another, far less disruptive approach: what I call “micro-moves.” These are small and often barely visible actions and interactions that my research and that of others has found to generate real and consequential change, rather than ...

How to Change an Organization Without Blowing It Up

How to Change an Organization Without Blowing It Up
Jan 18, 2014 by Karen Golden-Biddle
There is a middle ground between wholesale change and tentative pilot projects — and it could allow your organization to operate far more effectively. Too often, conventional approaches to organizational transformation resemble the Big Bang theory. Change occurs all at once, on a large scale and often in response to crisis. These approaches assume that  senior management creates a sense of urgency or takes dramatic action to trigger change. Frequently, the jolt comes from a new CEO eager to put his or her stamp on the organization. Yet, we know from a great deal of experience that ...